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. same time tomorrow. the factor right now. >> bill: o'reilly factor is on. >> tonight. >> no one in law enforcement in colorado. >> no one? >> editorial director of the denver posted talking about jessica's law but what he said is flat out false. what happens when the press colludes with the party. >> all i can say they are smears that begin during my election process. >> bill: more trouble for robert menendez. a grand jury to investigate him on corruption charges. geraldo has the latest. >> president obama is built a great time, a smart team. >> bill: bill gates still enamored with president obama. he wants to give him more power. does lou dobbs agree? >> caution you are about to enter the no-spin zone. the factor begins right now. ♪ ♪ >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching. what happens to democracy when the press actively supports a political party? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. it's widely believed that the national media in america is in the tank for president obama. they generally support his policies and when highway he does something
for the law but now he says he believes they should have the same benefits as heterosexual couples. >> on this day, corleones first hit the silver screen with the movie godfather. the story of the italian-american crime family first appeared in the best selling novel when paramount pictures announced the movie version. italian civil rights league rallied against it. uproar only boosted publicity. with francis ford "copolla and marlon brando in unforgettable roles, it won three oscars. >> critics put the godfather among the all time best. there is the music. moviegoers made an offer they couldn't refuse to watch 41 years years today. that is our fox report. are we going to roll through that music. i like that. i'm harris faulkner in for shepard smith. same time tomorrow. the factor right now. >> bill: o'reilly factor is on. >> tonight. >> no one in law enforcement in colorado. >> no one? >> editorial director of the denver posted talking about jessica's law but what he said is flat out false. what happens when the press colludes with the party. >> all i can say they are smears that
: the o'reilly factor is on. tonight, no one in law enforcement in colorado supported-- 2007, 2009. >> editorial director of the denver post talking about jessica's law and what he said was flat-out false and we'll prove it. what happens when the press colludes with a political party. president obama and colorado are in the middle of that question. >> i can only say what i said from the very beginning that these were smears that began during my election process. >> more trouble for senator menendez, a grand jury investigate him on charges. >> and also tonight, bill gates, still enamored with president obama and gates want to give him more power. does lou dobbs agree? caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> . >> greta:. >> bill: i'm bill o'reilly. what happens to democracy when the press actively support a political party? that's the subject of this evening's talking points memo. it is widely believed that the national media in america is in the tank for president obama. they generally support his policies and when he does something wrong, t
bust me? >> there are so many laws, everybody could be caught up in it. >> the avalanche of new laws, it makes criminals just about all of us. >> every citizen arguably could be shown to have vlated some regulation in these stacks, that is the danger. >> police never told knees girls why they were shut down. >> we tried to find out but the city official, they said really they shut down our lemonade stand. >> we're not aware of who made the lemonade or what the lonade with. you are still breaking the law and we can't let you do it. >> appleton, wisconsin shut down this stand and these kids were shut down, too. >> they said you need a permit. >> and hazelwood, illinois they settled on girl scout cookies from the front yard but the city said to stop. >> i said, what? cooes, come on. >> all has to people ran afoul of laws they didn't know existed and still don't understand. >> they are ununderstandable, not only to you but people like me, i am a lawyer and they are incomprehensible to me. >> even the police don't understand. she says the kids' lemonade stands violated the law. >> two off
of the national immigration law center has the latest on the debate over immigration reform. grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform looked at the budget proposals offered by house republicans and senate democrats and edward why it discusses how the federal communications uses a $9 billion fund to insure telephone and broadband services are available everywhere in the u.s. atshington journal" live 7:00 eastern on c-span. on monday, the chair of the national republican committee, will talk about the future of the party. and then legislation assault weapons ban bill passed out of committee and moving to the senate floor. this was the third gun bill passed by the judiciary committee but the only legislation to make it to either chamber of commerce since the mass shooting at sandy hook elementary school. this is one hour, 25 minutes. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i know senator feinstein has fought for this legislation and passionate about her belief in the need for legislation, and i respect her conviction, although i strongly oppose the bill. gun violence is a tragic problem in th
director of the denver post newspaper, apparently opposes jessica's law and mandates long prison sentences for child rapists and a man raped a 13-year-old girl for months, for months and pled guilty to sexual assault and was sentenced to two years in prison. also in colorado, 47-year-old jeffrey bingham, actually abused a 11-year-old boy almost a thousand times. he got one year in a colorado prison. so, it's simply outrageous that seven democrats in the colorado house killed jessica's law, saying that the state already has enough sanctions against child predators. it does not. speaker of the house, very liberal, refused to put jessica's law up for a full vote. now the denver post is sticking up for him. >> colorado has a strong sex offender laws and i don't see-- >> i've got a dozen, a dozen child rapists doing less than five years in your state, mr. hubbard, do research about it. >> and probation unique to colorado. >> bill: lifetime probation, ooh, lifetime probation for rape. if you had a kid and somebody raped that kid and they got lifetime probation you'd probably be out there with a
has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police officers and our training and our curriculu
really act as a good communicator and facilitator in the program from a law enforcement background. and the grant we get through public works really allows us to run effectively. >> great, thank you. >> [speaker not understood]. let me come on over here. what's your question? >> okay. [speaker not understood]. i've gotten three years of knowledge [speaker not understood]. my question is this. how am i going to get the police department, how am i going to get city council -- they're partially on board, but some of our people in public works are here today. how can i convey to them that i'm not a nut -- everybody here thinks i'm a nut because [speaker not understood]. how did they really take this seriously and realize that graffiti is a crime and it requires money and it requires attention from the officials, not just from covering graffiti? is there an answer? can you give me some sort of -- what's a good direction? >> [speaker not understood]. >> [speaker not understood]. basically the task force, they'll put together and try to convince the citizens something is happening, then i
john: seemed like they thought we had cocaine in the fruit. most americans support laws against prostitution but what if it were legal. >> it is safe. >> what if drugs were legal. it is working. but not in america here politicians keep passing more rules. >> i look over my shoulder, what are they going to find illegal tomorrow. >> have you no idea what you are up against. >> this could happen to you. >> you say you follow he around, you would fine 3 felonies. >> in america it like is everything is illegal. >> what is more american than opening a lemonade stand. thank you very much. for years kids have set up stands like this, today, the police may bust you. >> i was like really scared because i didn't know what was going to happen, we were just selling lemonade in 4front yard for 3 days on the third day police shut out down. john: their mom heard police yelling, i could hear them yelling from inside my house. >> cop over there will they bust me. >> there are so many vague laws that everyone ar arguably coulde caught up in it. john: this is just what the feds added last year, mak
in the fruit. most americans support laws against prostitution but what if it were legal. >> it is safe. >> what if drugs were legal. it is working. but not in america here politicians keep passing more rules. >> i look over my shoulder, what are they going to find illegal tomorrow. >> have you no idea what you are up against. >> this could happen to you. >> you say you follow he around, you would fine 3 felonies. >> in america it like is everything is illegal. >> what is more american than opening a lemonade stand. thank you very much. for years kids have set up stands like this, today, the police may bust you. >> i was like really scared because i didn't know what was going to happen, we were just selling lemonade in 4front yard for 3 days on the third day police shut out down. john: their mom heard police yelling, i could hear them yelling from inside my house. >> cop over there will they bust me. >> there are so many vague laws that everyone ar arguably coulde caught up in it. john: this is just what the feds added last year, makes criminals of just about all of us. >> every citizen
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
communities? and i think perhaps the law enforcement folks feel the cultures in the communities and see that come out in the adults. i would like to hear about how do you affect a culture and even in san francisco we have many cultures affecting what is valued, what is criticized. >> you know i think that richard touched upon this. it's a relationship of power and it's clearly going to differ from community to community; right. when i was telling you i was picked because because i didn't speak english or at all initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is
that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scientist is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a very big part in legal systems, but i think in the legal systems, we don't
. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise in support of yucca mountain which by law is designated as the site for permanent geological repository for our nation's spent nuclear fuel. last year the president's blue ribbon commission on america's nuclear future issued a report but barred from even evaluating the merits of yucca mountain, despite the fact that it has been approved in a bipartisan basis by congress and signed into law by the president -- actually reaffirmed by signing of the law in 2002, the initial law was passed in 1982, and the law was amended in 1987 which in a bipartisan manner passed thue both chambers, signed by -- through both chambers, signed by different presidents, established that yucca mountain would be the repository for our nuclear spent fuel. what the blue ribbon commission did say was any host community should expect incentives. that commitment is no different from nevada when it comes to yucca mountain, and good news. the local county is consenting and ready to negotiate with the department of energy. in advance of yucca mountain even receiving its first deliver
neil/lehrer productions >> ifill: supreme court justices weighed a challenge to an arizona law requiring proof of citizenship for voter registration. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we talk to marcia coyle about today's court arguments, and ask about the broader implications for other immigration laws. >> ifill: then we turn to the banking crisis in cyprus, as european union leaders called for a tax on savings accounts, prompting a drop in global stocks. >. it's outright theft. >> woodruff: jeffrey brown kicks off a week of stories about the middle east, starting with israel's new governing coalition sworn into office today. >> ifill: paul solman reports on older workers in academic institutions, professors in the classroom long past age 65. >> am i keeping track of jobs? yes. that's okay. as long as i'm a good teacher, that's what's important. >> woodruff: and we examine the republican national committee's call for a new direction for the g.o.p., a road map hoping for a rebound in 2016 and beyond. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight
your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. and make your business dream a reality. great first gig! let's go! party! awwwww... arigato! we are outta here! party...... finding you the perfect place, every step of the way. hotels.com >> day two of the 2013 cpac conference just wrapped up today, and the list of speakers was a who's who in the the conservative movement because you probably weren't able to tune into all 11-plus hours of that event although some of you may have. we did it for you. take a look at the highlights. >> it's up to us to make sure that we learn from our mistakes and my mistakes and that he we take advantage of that learning to make sure that we take back the nation, take back the white house, get the senate and put in place conservative principles. let's get this straight, to protect our children in school, we recommend a trained professional with a gun. they recommend scissors. and they say we're crazy? >> in our budget, draws a very sharp contrast with the left. it says to the people in unmistakable terms, they are the party
it seth's law in honor of her, she had been in and around sacramento for a long time. so the legislation in and of itself, i don't think it's going to work miracles, but it is definitely on people's radar now and i think you hear it in the media more and more. the reason we have a suicide barrier and the reason we are having legislation like this is because of the parents and the families because they are the ones that hurt the most and i would imagine part of the therapeutic thing, you've got to tell this story and telling it in the right place and the right time can be very effective. so seth's law does require that if you witness an act of bullying, that you must report it. >> is that for anybody? >> anyone, but particularly teachers. there is a -- sometimes we see things that aren't very pleasant and if you've ever taken it to muni, you know what i mean. your tendency is to turn away. i heard the word faggot on the play ground when i taught. the teachers were intimidated, they didn't want to be seen to have any empathy because that might reflect on them. it's crazy but that's p
at bringing in laws. so, maybe you can create some kind of law. you're so good at that. you would be the country to start that, i would be quite certain. we have to go about 10 steps through parliament and it takes 20 years to change a law. i think you can do it overnight. [laughter] >> well, maybe. thank you. (applause) >> we have another answer. >> if i might very quickly. >> yes, of course. >> i have worked with aerosol with youth on murals as well as individual projects. i've also done collage. we've done paint pens. we have used a number of different things from silk screen t-shirts to making logos. my experience with these youth is you might engage them through graffiti. you don't have to use arrow zoll. it's expensive. it's anywhere from 8 to $14 a can wherever you get it. and you also have to then worry about protecting the eyes, the hands and the proper respirator which could be 35 to $50 apiece per youth. so, to me it's a really expensive way to engage that graffiti side of the artistic or creative behavior. at the same time, montana wants their name out there. so, if yo
pitted a national law against a 2004 arizona voter registration bill. the case explores the extent of state powers against the controversial backdrop of voting restrictions. arizona's proposition 200 requires state residents to provide either a driver's license, passport, birth certificate or physical proof of citizenship before they can vote. but an existing federal law requires only a sworn statement of citizenship on a voter registration form. supporters say the arizona measure cuts down on voter fraud by keeping noncitizens from voting. but opponents argue the law unfairly tarring hes minorities, immigrants, and the elderly. the case is only the most recent dispute between arizona and the federal government related to immigration issues. over the summer, the supreme court upheld part of a top state law that allowed police to check for immigration papers. other states, including alabama, georgia, kansas and tennessee, have similar laws on the books and a number of other states are also considering comparable measures. the obama administration supports the challenge to the arizon
committee about the health care law and jobs. representative when more is a member of the house budget committee. she will discuss the budget proposed by both parties. the national review senior editor will be here to look at what's america's republicans. "washington journal" is live on c-span everyday at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> when it comes to the secretary of state and the people around her, what i found striking is her ability to stay focused. at all times as much as possible on what is happening. she does not get distracted by the details if they are not important. she has an ability to stay focused on the big picture. how is what is happening in afghanistan impacting what they are doing in the middle east? how was that impacting what they are trying to do in asia? she had a sense of the strategy. she is surrounded by people helping her. she has staff to allow her -- i talk about that. that allows her to focus on what matters. she does not have to worry about lunch. it was just arrived. she will happened while she is thinking about the bigger picture. kim ghattas looks at hillary cl
to be the law until 2004. the restriction on the sale of magazines that hold more than ten bullets at a time. that bill will now go to the full senate. and so far, no republicans have said they will support it. in debating it today, though, something kind of amazing happened in the senate and we have the tape of it. i want to show you the tape and what's going to happen here at the beginning is that you will see the republican senator from texas ted cruz, freshman senator giving a little lecture about what he thinks is important in this discussion. this lecture specifically to senator dianne feinstein, but bear with me. sit through the lecture for a second because what you're watching for here, what you want to see is the reaction to the lecture. watch. >> if i might pose a question to the senior senator from california. it seems to me that all of us should begin as our foundational document with the constitution. and the second amendment in the bill of rights provides that the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed. the term the right of the people when the framers
it personally, and as a matter of policy and law. embedded in a broader effort to advance equality and opportunity for lgbt americans and all americans. to deny the opportunity to any of our daughters and sons, solely on the basis of who they are, and who they love is to deny them the chance to live up to their own god-given potential. >> one of the things that she said in this video that gay rights are human rights and human rights are gay rights, which is an echo of her famous declaration at the international women's conference in beijing back in '95. where she really stirred the fires in international diplomacy as first lady by declaring women's rights human rights. >> and that was controversial back then. that was seen as a sort of revolutionary statement, the state department was nervous that she said that. they didn't really want that to happen. i think we will be looking back ten, 20 years on the notion that gay rights are human rights and think, well, duh, the same way we think about women's rights now. >> a real generational change certainly in the republican party as we w
the last few years. we know what economic impacts this law is already having as it it -- its still gnashient implement -- nascient implementation has moved forward. we need to make ourselves accountable to the american people for this law and what we now know is in this law. i therefore respectfully urge each and every one of my colleagues to support this amendment. thank you, madam president. i yield back my time. ms. mikulski: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: madam president, i rise to speak on the cruz amendment. as i said, i'm glad senator lee had his chance. as i said, the cruz amendment would prevent the department of health and human services from implementing funding for the discretionary spending aspects of the affordable care act. as the presiding officer knows of the affordable care act so well and played a major part in it when she was a member of the house of representatives, you know that this would be -- have disastrous consequences. its consequence would essentially defund the affordable care act. they call it obamacar
be intervention so i think the partnership between law enforcement and between the schools and the school resource officers is critically important. we have prosecuted parents by the way who have encouraged their children to bully in a dramatic way. we prosecuted a mother who forced the 14 year old daughter to bully a 12 year old and resulted in the 14 year old physically attacking the girl with the mother screaming at her if she didn't continue to beat the kid she was going to get beaten and the kids watching were filming it on their smartphones and that girl -- the daughter was also a victim of bullying by her own mother and i think this is a place where law enforcement can step in and hold parents accountable and doing things aggressive or against the law and encourage the kids to do something against the law and getting the parent's intention and bring them in on some level. >> quickly i want to say something about this. i appreciate what you have said about the adults and the adults having responsibility but i'm going to speak practical callity. i have been a teacher and principal in diff
requirements. >> thank you. and apply to the law today los angeles laws that have passed and sometimes it does practically change the design. sometimes there are differences in code that really make that change and it might be to the detriment of how we might see the design. i think it would be useful in your analysis to look at some of those projects and where the code has changed and how that can be impacted in the over all project design. i'm all fore this kind of 60 day window process because i don't particularly find our discussion as particularly robust until they come back for extension but it's worth having a hearing if we choose those projects to review drawings. i recognize the challenges that what they may not -- people might opt in the process without actually being quite building permit ready. that's the challenge we have when people come for a 3 year entitlement. what they may come for a 3 year extension may not manifest when they do build. that's something we should have a whole separate discussion if the issue of design and outcome is changed. it's truly the change when we have
a's law. >> bill: colorado speaker of the house openly gay politician. "the denver post" called me a homophobe bigot. the man who wrote that will be here tonight. >> you are lucky o'reilly wasn't here today, sir. >> bill: also tonight, dennis miller on government waste and that could be brutal. caution, you are about to enter the no spin zone. the factor begins right now. >> bill: hi, i'm bill o'reilly. thanks for watching us tonight. new pope has been selected, so the talking points memo on how president obama is reacting to the budget chaos will be on our second segment tonight. but first the lead story. cardinal jorge bergoglio is the new pope. calling himself pope francis the 76-year-old is a jesuit who is an accomplished intellectual, a defender of the poor, and fairly conservative on social issues. pope francis is the 266th pope and is one of the oldest candidates in the conclave. joining us now from rome, fox news analyst father jonathan morris. so, let's take it step-by-step because people want to be introduced to the pope. i understand while cardinal in buenos aries, he di
with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forward to the rest of the day, i appreciate your presence and i appreciate your leadership
enhancement. obviously i could go on and on and the leadership is so much appreciated by law enforcement in this country i can't begin to say. (applause). >> thanks very much, chief. the mayor and the chief have mentioned the tremendous leadership of senator feinstein. i told her of this meeting today, she is in washington, the judiciary committee had its own meeting this morning, but she sends her resolved. she's determined and you know when diane is determined. (applause). >> supervisor cohen, leadership, we chatted with her yet and she talked about violence in the community and what that means to children who have to experience it, even if you are not personally apparently injured but that they are traumatickly injured and we thank melia for her leadership as well. now we come to the part of the program that goes to the core of the matter. the mayor is against illegal guns and that initiative, which is a national and very strong initiative, the chief talks about being part of the police chiefs who spoke from a congressional perspective, joe has worked with the vice president on thi
make sure every elementary, every public school complies with williams versus state of california law which my son and i started and was signed into law by arnold schwarzenegger in 2004. and even today, even that law is not complied with by the principals, teachers, staff and the schools of california. so it's so sad for me that i've worked this hard without sounding the alarm, blowing the trumpet or anything, that i was the author of this law. but now it's still violated in the schools of california. so my point is this. we need to bring god back into the equation. we need to bring god back into the equation. with god, we can do everything. >> thank you very much. >> thank you. (applause). >> mark lynch. >> thanks so much for having this get-together. i've seen a lot of people that are able to talk to each other and have calm discussions but i'm a leader of a construction trade union in san mateo county and i know what's on my members and this is not the kind of discussion we could have because of in college in a debate class, things like red herrings and slippery slopes and w
rid of the clearly obsolete voting rights act of 1965. >> the voting rights act has been the law of the land for nearly half a century helping to ensure that are notes are not -- minorities are not denied the right to vote. the law requires states with a history of discrimination to get federal approval before changing how they conduct elections. >> jon: like if you want a loan but have a history of bad credit you may need extra documentation or get a cosigner or if you want to move near a school and you are a sex offender, you have to thrawn by someone. [laughter] shelby county, alabama s leading the charge to strike what they consider to be an unfair provision of the voting rights act. they are hoping to become the jackie robinson's of people who historically disenfranchised people like jackie robinson. >> today shelby county alabama challenged the law at the supreme court. >> the america that elected barack obama is not the america of our parents and grandparents. >> jon: it's a completely different america. we have cell phones now and things cost more than a nickle. coca-cola
of the challenge moving forward and i have had many conversations with superintendents and law enforcement officials as well about how we can address this data integrity issue and how a school won't be hoisted by their own petard because they had the courage to collect the data when other schools kind of look the other way. so, again, it's a hard question to answer in ways that are other than anecdote. there have been survey data and things of that nature, but i feel uncomfortable saying unequivocally this is what we know, these are the trends. i like to be evidence based and i'm not sure the evidence allows that. >> roslyn, challenges to you and secretary duncan. >> for the first time you can see data for the first time about the -- discipline and students referred to law enforcement, suspensions more than once. on the bullying and harassment we are also collecting for the first time ever data on the number of incidents of students disciplined for bullying and harassment. they are not exactly reliable. lots of folks aren't collecting this. our collection is at the school level so you
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,277 (some duplicates have been removed)